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An Authentic New Perspective on a Traditional Marisquería

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Channeling the Flavors of the Mexican Seaside

Como Como, a marisquería (seafood restaurant) and raw bar, channels the flavors of Puerto Escondido, Los Cabos, Acapulco, and other seaside destinations, offering an authentic new perspective on a traditional marisqueria. The dramatic dining room features a striking copper-and-wrought-iron "fuego" (fire station), where diners can watch the whole fish they've selected being cooked over a wood-burning grill, the intoxicating fumes enveloping the whole room. The restaurant also offers outdoor dining in a lush courtyard layered with colored tilework, hanging plants, and stone benches shaped like animals.
Executive Chef Scott Linquist — who has traveled extensively throughout Mexico, researching local recipes, cooking in private homes, guiding culinary trips, and judging at esteemed events — offers dishes based on traditional techniques. Many dishes feature whole grilled fish caught in local waters, such as Pescado a la Talla: snapper that is butterflied, grilled, and painted with two marinades - green on one side and red on the other. Tikin-Xic is a Mayan preparation of whole branzino flavored with bitter orange, habanero chiles, and achiote, cooked in banana leaves, and unwrapped, fragrant and steaming, at the table. Tableside presentations add to the show, whether a traditional Caesar Salad (a dish born in Tijuana, Mexico), or hand-chopped Tartar de Pescado (fish of the day), tingling with spices.

Hours

  • WED, THUR, SUN | 6PM - 11PM
  • FRI - SAT | 6PM - 12PM

BAR

  • WED - SUN | 6PM - 2AM

More Info

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Our menus

Seafood

Seafood

The dinner menu features whole grilled branzino caught in local waters, such as Pescado a la Talla: snapper that is butterflied, grilled, and painted with two marinades - green on one side and red on the other. Tikin-Xic is a Mayan preparation of whole fish flavored with bitter orange, habanero chiles, and achiote, cooked in banana leaves, and unwrapped, fragrant and steaming, at the table. Tableside presentations add a theatrical flair, whether a traditional Caesar Salad (a dish born in Tijuana, Mexico), or hand-chopped Tartar de Pescado (fish of the day), tingling with spices.

Vegetarian

Vegetarian

Vegetable dishes are roasted in the fuego's Josper charcoal oven and served in cast-iron pans, including Esquites, roasted corn with homemade garlic aioli, morita chile, and cotija cheese; and Charcoal Oven roasted artichokes with roasted jalapeño aioli, buttery herbed bread crumbs and charred lemon. Many dishes are accompanied by tortillas, ground and pressed in-house and cooked on a comal, the traditional Mexican griddle.

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Meats & Tableside

Other dishes on the dinner menu include Alambre al Pastor: pork tenderloin grilled on skewers with pineapple and spring onions, a variation on Mexico City's beloved al pastor tacos; a rotating selection of traditional Oaxacan-style mole sauces; and meat dishes, including Chuletón (ribeye steak), Filete (filet mignon), and adobo marinated rack of lamb all of them flame-grilled in the fuego and served with a variety of house-made sauces and condiments.
Barra Cruda

Barra Cruda

A barra cruda (raw bar) sits on a monolithic, rough-cut stone in the middle of the dining room. Dishes from the barra cruda come with a Mexican twist, like oysters served with a pineapple-vinegar mignonette or a picadillo made with tomatillos and cucumbers. Como Como also features traditional coastal varieties of ceviches. At the center of the bar is a spectacular "tequila tree" sculpture made of hand-blown glass spheres and copper pipes, symbolizing the distillation process that transforms the blue agave plant into tequila and mezcal. Tequila travels through this dramatically lit forest of glass and metal until it is dispensed by bartenders into creative cocktails.
Tequila Tree

Tequila Tree

At the center of the bar is a spectacular "tequila tree" sculpture made of hand-blown glass spheres and copper pipes, symbolizing the distillation process that transforms the blue agave plant into tequila and mezcal. Tequila travels through this dramatically lit forest of glass and metal until it is dispensed by bartenders into creative cocktails.
“Fresh, local whole fish is prepared directly in front of diners from the fuego, elevating the seafood traditions of Mexico. When you combine that with the immersive design of the restaurant, it provides an environment that truly feels like you are being transported to a different place.”
Alan Drummond, Partner, Coyo Group
@comocomo_miami
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